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  • davidw 21:30:03 on 2016-06-25 Permalink
    Tags: data, , TED   

    TED, scraped 

    TED used to have an open API. TED no longer supports its open API. I want to do a little exploring of what the world looks like to TED, so I scraped the data from 2,228 TED Talk pages. This includes the title, author, tags, description, link to the transcript, number of times shared, and year. You can get it from here. (I named it tedTalksMetadata.txt, but it’s really a JSON file.)

    “Scraping” means having a computer program look at the HTML underneath a Web page and try to figure out which elements refer to what. Scraping is always a chancy enterprise because the cues indicating which text is the date and which is the title may be inconsistent across pages, and may be changed by the owners at any time. So I did the best I could, which is not very good. Sometimes page owners aren’t happy about being scraped, but in this case it only meant one visit for each page, which is not a lot of burden for a site that has pages that get hundreds of thousands and sometimes millions of visits.

    I’ve also posted at GitHub the php scripts I wrote to do the scraping. Please don’t laugh.

    If you use the JSON to explore TED metadata, please let me know if you come up with anything interesting that you’re willing to share. Thanks!

    The post TED, scraped appeared first on Joho the Blog.

     
  • davidw 23:13:20 on 2016-06-23 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    No more rockstars 

    Leigh Honeywell [twitter: @hypatiadotca] has posted an important essay — No More Rockstars — written by her, Valerie Aurora (@vaurorapub), and Mary Gardiner (@me_gardiner). There’s a lot in it, and it’s clear and well-written, so it does not need summarizing by me, except to let you know why I think you should read it: It addresses the power imbalance implicit in a conceptual framework that thinks some industry leaders are special and therefore not subject to the same rules as the rest of us. The post analytically describes the phenomenon and suggests ways to avoid the dangers.

    Lexi Gill writes a follow-on piece about one particular way that the rockstar culture leads to inequities:

    … rock stars are often unofficial gatekeepers to an entire community or industry. They not only get to decide who’s “in” and who’s “out,” but have privileged access to an endless stream of new victims to choose from. Once “in,” the rock star also has special power to manipulate a newcomer’s experience, role and relationships within the community.

    Having worked for many people and having observed many more, I can say that for me the best leaders are people whose joy comes from helping people flourish, that is, to discover and become who they are, even if that means developing away from the organization. Those are the women and men who have made the biggest difference in my professional life. I thank them for it.

    …All part of the privilege of being a man.

    The post No more rockstars appeared first on Joho the Blog.

     
  • davidw 23:13:20 on 2016-06-23 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    No more rockstars 

    Leigh Honeywell [twitter: @hypatiadotca] has posted an important essay — No More Rockstars — written by her, Valerie Aurora (@vaurorapub), and Mary Gardiner (@me_gardiner). There’s a lot in it, and it’s clear and well-written, so it does not need summarizing by me, except to let you know why I think you should read it: It addresses the power imbalance implicit in a conceptual framework that thinks some industry leaders are special and therefore not subject to the same rules as the rest of us. The post analytically describes the phenomenon and suggests ways to avoid the dangers.

    Lexi Gill writes a follow-on piece about one particular way that the rockstar culture leads to inequities:

    … rock stars are often unofficial gatekeepers to an entire community or industry. They not only get to decide who’s “in” and who’s “out,” but have privileged access to an endless stream of new victims to choose from. Once “in,” the rock star also has special power to manipulate a newcomer’s experience, role and relationships within the community.

    Having worked for many people and having observed many more, I can say that for me the best leaders are people whose joy comes from helping people flourish, that is, to discover and become who they are, even if that means developing away from the organization. Those are the women and men who have made the biggest difference in my professional life. I thank them for it.

    …All part of the privilege of being a man.

    The post No more rockstars appeared first on Joho the Blog.

     
  • Ra•kl (Raquel) 03:46:38 on 2016-06-19 Permalink
    Tags: getinmyy   

    I texted a few friends after seeing this recipe for molten Mac… 

    A video posted by Rara (@rakerula) on



    I texted a few friends after seeing this recipe for molten Mac and cheese. Mister mister took the challenge, however he opted not to use velveeta cheese. So hardly no lava eruption womp womp. Still tasted yum for a for a first try. #getinmyy

     
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